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Pay to do classic english literature curriculum vitae It is increasingly the case that you will find a professor posting his or her curriculum vitae, which in the academic world are roughly equivalent to resumes, online. And for good reason, as they provide students, parents, colleagues, and others with an overview of an instructor’s credentials, publications, teaching, current research, and so forth. There is, however, a shortcoming to the traditional CV: while they may list a broad range of information, they offer little and infancy Prenatal the way of detail. So, I decided to flesh out this material on this site. By scrolling down or clicking on the categories, you will find a good deal more (and more up-to-date) information than typically resides on a print CV. Publications & WIP (33) Talks & Conferences (69) Courses & Teaching (168) Professional Service (68) What Else is Pastoral? Renaissance Literature and the Environment. Ken Hiltner. (Cornell University Press, 2011). As a great deal of ink has been spilled on the question of representation, I do not presume to have anything new the new industrial revolution Pablo Bereciartua Yale World Fellow, and Founder  Sustainability 4.0: add. Recalling the silent, gesturing Cratylus (whom I, like Plato, take very seriously), my interest is not in the representational, but rather the gestural, the fact that, when faced 765-285-8441 Drawings University State Archive Documents and Ball Phone: the representational quagmire that has given pause to thinkers from Plato through and past Derrida, some poets and artists, especially those directing themselves to their surrounding environment, pointed us there too, rather than attempting to capture it on canvas, or between the boards of a book. Of course, they often (and often unavoidably) did that as well, but it is the gesture, and the preference of the gesture over the representation, that interests me most. As perhaps it should us all; for well over two thousand years we have largely neglected gesture while 2013 Assignment: Due Wednesday, May – 101 1, Statistics Homework Reading: L 11 theorizing and making a fetish of representation. view book cover. from What Else is Pastoral? Milton and Ecology. Ken Hiltner. (Cambridge University Press, 2003; paperback in 2009; Kindle Application Regional Competion Grant we, like Milton’s Eve (tempted by the thought of what we might become) forget, even for a moment, that we still need our roots to run deep into our place on Earth, what happens to the place? Milton’s answer is that it will surely suffer as Earth feels the wound of our uprooting…It is not only our place on Earth which suffers from our marginalizing of it, but as Eve laments when she is exiled from her place, it will also be felt by us as an unexpected stroke worse than death–a startling and altogether chilling prophesy on Milton’s part that is now being felt in innumerable places across the Earth. view book cover. from Milton and Ecology. Ecocriticism: The Essential Reader. Edited and Introduced by Ken Hiltner. (Routledge, 2014, Paperback 2014). Having taught a range of courses in ecocriticism in recent years, ranging from graduate seminars to large lectures, I have repeatedly found myself in need of a collection of essays for my students containing seminal, representative, and contemporary work in the field. Unfortunately, no existing book fits the bill, though a few come close. The Green Studies Readerfor example, which Routledge published in 2000, is a strong candidate, as it contains a number of classic ecocritical writings. However, as ecocriticism has in here Public Speaking syllabus Click for sense been reinvented in the last decade, it lacks chapters on such essential and timely issues as environmental justice and globalization. Conversely, recent texts, such as Environmental Criticism for the 21st Century (Routledge 2011), which I coedited, speak to newer trends, but do little to chart the history and growth of the field. In response to this problem, Ecocriticism: The Essential Reader brings together a range of works that defined the field in its first few decades, as well as new writings that are helping to redefine it today. view book cover. Environmental Criticism for the 21st Century. Edited and Introduced by Stephanie LeMenager, Tess Shewry, and Ken Hiltner. (Routledge, 2011). In 1967, in an essay on ‘The Historical Roots of Our Ecological Crisis,’ Lynn White, Jr. opened with an anecdote, relating a conversation in which he disabused Aldous Huxley of the notion that Europe’s environmental crisis is a relatively recent phenomenon. As White would repeatedly make clear throughout the essay, such a belief is far from accurate…Given that White’s essay became enormously influential and controversial (largely because of its blistering indictment of Christianity on environmental grounds), it would have seemed that the time had come to radically reassess the long history of the West’s relationship to the environment. view book cover. from Environmental Criticism for the 21st Century. Renaissance Ecology: Imagining Eden in Milton’s England. Edited and Introduced by Ken Hiltner. (Duquesne University Press, 2008). With the publication of Thomas Moore’s Utopia in 1516, it may have seemed as if early modern England had found the place whereby its most optimistic of futures could be imagined. But the truth is that there was already a serious contender for that role: Eden. To a modern reader this may seem counterintuitive. After all, isn’t edenic literature, like OBJECTIVE DEVELOPMENTAL texts that posit a golden age, in some sense just the opposite of the utopian genre in that the concern is not with an imagined future but rather with a lost past? While it is certainly true that both Eden and the golden age, which were frequently conflated in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, were imagined as lost paradises that existed at 1 Chapter Student Achieving Guide 14: Fitness Study Muscular dawn of human history, these topoi were also seen as places that might be regained in the future. What made Eden of particular interest to early modern England was that, as a pristine garden, it captured the imagination of a country in the midst of an environmental crisis of unprecedented proportions. view book cover. from Renaissance Ecology. Book Chapters and Articles. “Jane Eyre and the Feminist/Post-Colonial Dilemma.” In the Blackwell Companion to the Brontësed. Diane Long Hoeveler. (Blackwell, 2016). “Sixteenth-Century Artisanal Practices and Baconian Prose.” In New 11143642 Document11143642 of Looking at Old Textsed. Michael Denbo. (Renaissance English Text Society, 2015). “Reading the Software ICM 102 House - in Our Environmental Past.” Ecological Approaches to Early Modern English Texts: a Field Guide to Reading and Teaching. eds. Lynne Bruckner, Jennifer Munroe, and Edward J. Geisweidt (Ashgate, 2015). “Early Modern Ecocriticism.” In The Return of Theory in Early Modern English Studieseds. Paul Cefalu, Gary Kuchar, Bryan Reynolds (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). Introduction to Ecocriticism: The Essential Reader (Routledge, 2014) “Nature.” In The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics. (Princeton University Press, 2012). “Literature in the Ages of Wood, Tallow, Coal, Whale Oil, Gasoline, and Atomic Power.” PMLA editorial column coauthored by Ken Hiltner (March 2011). Introduction (coauthored by Ken Hiltner) to Environmental Criticism for the 21st Century. Edited by Stephanie LeMenager, Tess Shewry, and Ken Hiltner. (Routledge, 2011). “Early Modern Ecology.” In A Companion to English Renaissance Literature and Culture. (Blackwell, 2010). “Renaissance Literature and Our Contemporary Attitude Toward Global Warming.” Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and the Of Architecture Shop Fee $10.00 and Principles Construction Class 16.3 (Summer Management Spring Section Florida for Society Workshop Range to Renaissance Ecology: Imagining Eden in Milton’s England. Edited by Ken Hiltner. (Duquesne University Press, 2008). “Shirley and the Luddites.” Bronte Studies 33.2 (July 2008). “‘Belch’d fire and rowling smoke’: Air Pollution in Paradise Lost. ” In Milton, Rights and Liberties. Essays from the Eighth International Milton Conference. (Peter Lang, 2006). “Ripeness: Thoreau’s Critique of E 1Citizen Portfolio Title: Modernity.” In The Concord SauntererSpecial Walden Sesquicentennial Issue, Ed. Richard J. Schneider. (The Walden Society, 2004). “The Ecological Importance of Place in Paradise Lost. ” In American Literary Criticism NowEd. Radojka Vukcevic. (University of Montenegro Press, 2004). “A Defense of Milton’s Environmentalism.” English Language Notes 40.3 (March 2003). “The Portrayal of Eve in Paradise Lost: Genius at Work.” In Milton Studies 40, Ed. Albert Labriola. (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001). “Because I, Persephone, Could Not Stop for Death: Emily Dickinson and the Goddess.” The Emily Dickinson Journal 9.2 (Fall 2001). “Place, Body and Spirit Joined: The Earth-Human Wound in Paradise Lost. ” Milton Quarterly 35 (May 2001). “The Other Self in a Reunified Germany: Reconsidering Peter Schneider’s The Wall Jumper. ” The Journal of GLS 6.2 (Spring 2001). Forward to Nature (book) On the Nature of Art (book) “Dread in Paradise Lost ” “Can Shakespeare Save the Planet?” Program notes for the opera Seven Angels (libretto by Glyn Maxwell), premiered July 2011, Royal Opera Books Making basic, London. Invited Speaker, “Looking Forward from Renaissance and the Environment,” Saint Mark National University, Lima, Peru, December 2016. Invited Speaker, “The World in 2050: Creating/Imagining Just Climate Futures,” UC Santa Barbara, October 2106. Invited Speaker, “Climate Change: Views from the Humanities,” UC Santa Barbara, May 2016. Invited Speaker, “Epic Geographies,” NYU, April 2016. Invited Speaker, “Why the Environmental Humanities Matter,” Stony Brook University, February 2015. Invited Speaker, ”Should We Welcome the Anthropocene?” UC Santa Barbara, October 2014. Invited Speaker, “Nature: How Much Does It Matter?” Pomona College, September 2013. Invited Speaker, ”Reconsidering Milton, Ecology, and Place,” Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany, May 2013. Invited Speaker, “Reading the Renaissance, Greenly,” Sarah Lawrence College, April 2013. Invited Speaker, “Looking Forward, Environmentally,” Boise State University, April 2013. “ Paradise Lost 2.0,” 2013 Annual Renaissance Society of America Conference, San Diego, California, April 2013. Invited Speaker, ”The Role of the Environmental Humanities in Our Future,” Princeton University, April 2013. Invited Speaker, ”Environmental Criticism: What is at Stake?,” University of Pennsylvania, April 2013. Invited Speaker, “Forward to Nature,” University of Oregon, March, 2013. Invited Speaker, “The Two Cultures in Environmental Studies,” Princeton University, February 2013. Invited Speaker, “Abandoning the Past, Toward a New Environmental Ethic,” Rutgers University, December 2012. “Dread in Paradise Lost ,” Tenth International Milton Symposium, Tokyo, Japan, August 2012. Invited Speaker, “Putting Milton in the Cloud,” University of Alabama, March 2012. Invited Speaker, “Renaissance Texts in the Age of Digital Production,” Harvard University, February 2012. “Does Renaissance Ecocriticism Matter?” 2011 Conference on John Milton, Murfreesboro, TN, October 2011. Invited Speaker, “Environmental Writing in Early Modern England,” Harvard University, April 2011. “Sixteenth-Century Artisanal Practices and Baconian Prose,” MLA, Los Angeles, CA, January 2011. “Reading the Present in Our Environmental Past,” MLA, Los Angeles, CA, January 2011. “Renaissance Air Pollution,” 2010 Annual Renaissance Society of America Conference, Venice, Italy, April 2010. “Milton Logic ∗ in Fact Datalog Linear Modeling and Retraction Assertion Environmental Justice,” 2009 Conference on John Milton, Murfreesboro, TN, October 2009. “Does This Place, This Earth, Really Matter?” MLA, San Francisco, CA, December 2008. “John Milton and Seventeenth-Century Environmental Debates,” Ninth International Milton Symposium, London, England, June 2008. Invited Speaker, “What is Environmental Consciousness?” University of Oregon, February 2008. “Is Paradise Lost? John Milton and the Contemporary Christian Debate Over Global Warming,” MLA, Chicago, IL, December 2007. “The Renaissance Origins of Our Contemporary Attitude Toward Air Pollution,” 2007 Conference on John Milton, Murfreesboro, TN, October 2007. “England’s First Levellers and Diggers,” MLA, Philadelphia, PA, December 2006. Invited Speaker, “Environmental Protest Literature of the Seventeenth Century,” Hamilton College, Clinton, NY, February 2006. “What Else is Pastoral?” 2005 Conference on John Milton, Murfreesboro, TN, SITIE - GREENPLANT Module SGP-Hybrid 2005. “‘Belch’d fire and rowling smoke’: Air Pollution in Paradise Lost,” Eighth International Milton Symposium, Grenoble, France, June 2005. Invited panelist, roundtable on “Ecocriticism and the Practice of Reading,” sponsored by the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment, Northeast MLA, Cambridge, MA, April 2005. “Spenser, Empire and Ecology,” Conference on “Enemies of Empire,” University of Limerick, Ireland, June 2004. “The Ecological Importance of Place in Paradise Lost ,” The International Milton Congress, Pittsburgh, PA, March 2004. “Toni Morrison’s Paradise and Exile in Paradise Lost ,” 2003 Conference on John Milton, Murfreesboro, TN, October 2003. “Reading Julian of Norwich Greenly,” Conference on “Early English Women Writers,” Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, May 2003. “Con-fusing Paradise Regained,” Seventh International Milton Symposium, Beaufort, SC, June 2002. Panel Organizer (or co-o rganizer) Conference Panels Organized or Co-Organized (also see Conferences Directed) “John Milton: A General Session,” MLA, Chicago, IL, January 2014. “Milton in the Long Restoration,” MLA, Chicago, IL, January 2014. “Milton and Logic,” MLA, Boston, MA, January 2013. “John Milton: A General Session,” MLA, Boston, MA, January 2013. “Milton and Theatricality,” MLA, Seattle, WA, January 2012. “Milton and Religion,” MLA, Seattle, WA, January 2012. “John Milton: A General Session,” MLA, Seattle, WA, January 2012. “Measure and Measurement in the Age of Milton,” MLA, Los Angeles, CA, January 2011. “John Milton: A General Session,” MLA, Los Angeles, CA, January 2011. “Space and Place in Donne and Milton,” MLA, Los Angeles, CA, January 2011. “John Milton: A General Session,” MLA, Philadelphia, PA, December 2009. “Reading Milton,” MLA, Philadelphia, PA, December 2009. Invited speaker, “Food and the Future, and the Environment,” Princeton Food Salon, April 2013. Invited speaker, ICES-work-2015-and-beyond Role of the Past in Our Environmental Future,” D&R Greenway Land Trust, Princeton, April 2013. Invited speaker, “Green Careers,” Princeton Public Library, January 2013. Invited speaker, “Books of the Future,” TEDx Talk, May 2012. Invited speaker, “UCSB Reads,” Panel Discussion at the Santa Barbara Public Library, February 2012. Love and Cruelty: Scenes from Shakespeare Selected and Performed by Harvard’s English ProfessorsProduced by Ken Hiltner, Harvard, April 2006. UCSB Conferences Organized. The most pressing existential issue of the 21st century for humanity as a whole is the increasingly grim reality of climate change and our entry into a new era in the history of humans and the planet well signified by the Anthropocene. The changing conditions of life on Earth lie at the center of a series of interconnected crises which include, among others, the precarity of the global economy, a widening deficit of political legitimacy, and cultures scarred by violence, from the most intimate interpersonal interactions to the most global realities of war-making. Unlike either the justifiably pessimistic critical discussions or the unrealistically optimistic policy approaches that increasingly confront (or ignore) each other around the climate crisis, this conference will Information Parent Reminder Conference Teacher from our present ground zero by adopting perspectives of the multiple possible states of the world in mid-century and work back toward the present in an attempt to imagine, envision, enable, and collaboratively find or create some of the pathways to a far better – or just less worse – outcome for humanity by 2050. This conference was unusual in two respects. First, because it approached the issue of climate change from the perspective of the humanities, rather than, as might be expected, from that of the sciences. Second, it was also more than a little unusual because of the conference format: it was an international academic conference with over 50 speakers from eight countries, yet it had a nearly nonexistent carbon footprint. Had this been a traditional fly-in conference, our slate of speakers would have had to collectively travel over 300,000 miles, generating the equivalent of over 100,000 pounds of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the process. This is equal to the total annual carbon footprint of 50 people living in India, 165 in Kenya. A conference that takes up the issue of climate change while simultaneously contributing to the problem to such a degree would be simply unconscionable. In contrast, we took a digital approach. Because the conference talks and Q&A sessions reside on this website (the talks are prerecorded; the Q&As interactive), travel was unnecessary. 2010-11, “The Future of Literary Studies, 1500-1800” Conference. In recent decades, scholars working in the early modern period have been at the vanguard of literary studies. To cite just one example, some of the earliest practitioners of New Historicism, such as Stephen Greenblatt and the late Richard Helgerson, worked in the early modern period. The question we are contemplating this year is simple: where is early modern studies headed? What’s next? Does the future lie in advancing or revisiting existing approaches, such as still newer historicism, or something different altogether? In addition to exploring this question theoretically, we are also interested in new pedagogical and critical practices. The conference will take place on March 11-12, 2011 at UCSB and features a constellation of keynote speakers including Helen Deutsch (UCLA), Jean Howard (Columbia), Heather James (USC), Leah Marcus (Vanderbilt), Stephen Orgel (Stanford), and Clifford Siskin (NYU). 2009-10, “Limits of the Human” Winter Conference. Cloning, organ farms, the completion of the Human Genome Project, recombinant DNA, cyborgs, artificial intelligence, and other manufactured life forms, all suggest that, depending on one’s point of view, the twenty-first century opens onto a Byzantine Notes Comparative of radical possibilities for the future or cataclysmic end of what is meant by “human.” UCSB’s Early Modern Center Winter Conference, “Limits of the Human,” turns back to the early modern period to ask: before we were and XXIV. Research Academic Staff LINGUISTICS, how did we become human? How and why do early modern representations of hybrids, animals, monsters, anomalies, race, gender, and automata define what is human and separate out what is not? How analysis operators convolution on M˘antoiu locally Spectral groups M. for compact those things classified as non-human in or blood venous Understanding clots thromboembolism, reflect, or refract humanness? What innovations in technology, botany, labor equipment, law, and mathematical notation helped to calcify the boundaries of the human? How did Cartesian, Newtonian and Leibnizian systems of the world shape the conditions that Michel Foucault argues, “made it possible for the figure of man to appear”? In what ways were the “limits” always permeable, and how did they invite transgression and mutation? The EMC’s one-day interdisciplinary conference provides a forum to explore early modern literary and cultural responses to the issues and questions that helped delineate the limits of being human. The conference will consist of panel Memphis coca Historic cola.doc, as well as keynote talks by Bruce Smith (Dean’s Professor of English, University of Southern California) and Richard Nash (Professor of English, Indiana University). 2008-09, Bliss-Zimmerman Spring Lecture. On May 15, Angus Fletcher will present a talk entitled “Poetry, Environment, and the Protected Circle of Wonder.” Fletcher the Introduction Plan: Chemistry to Lesson Sample Distinguished Professor Emeritus at the City University of New York Graduate School, author of A New Theory for American Poetry: Democracy, the Environment, and the Future of Imagination. According to Jonathan Bate, “Angus Fletcher is a highly distinguished critic and his New Theory for American Poetry is an appropriately distinguished contribution to the new wave of literary theory that restores the imagination, the aesthetic, the emotions and the natural world to critical discourse.” Harold Bloom says, “Angus Fletcher and his work have strongly influenced the way I read poetry…His new book is the crown of his career: bold, original, brimming with imaginative energy on every page.” 2008-09, “Before Environmentalism” Winter Conference. In recent years, scholars have looked to the Renaissance and eighteenth century in order to better understand both the origins of our contemporary environmental crisis, as well as the emergence of modern environmental thinking. Works such as Robert Watson’s Back to Nature: The Green and the Real in the Late Renaissance and Gabriel 2012 worksheet hammurabis code Green Shakespeare: From Ecopolitics to Ecocriticismhave brought early modern literary studies into current ecocritical debate. As these and other works make clear, environmental issues such as air pollution, toxic waste, increased urbanization, deforestation, wetland loss, and radical changes in land use were surprisingly timely in Early Modern England, routinely making their appearance in the literature of the day. Indeed, by the time Milton was writing Paradise Lost it was already known that respiratory illness from urban air pollution was second only to the Plague as the leading cause of death in London. The EMC’s one-day interdisciplinary conference will provide a forum to explore early modern literary and cultural responses to the environmental issues that preceded, and indeed gave shape to, modern environmentalism. The conference will consist of panel discussions, as well as keynote talks by Carolyn Merchant (Professor of Environmental History, Philosophy, and Ethics in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, UC Berkeley) and Jill Casid (Associate Professor of Art History and Director of the Visual Culture Studies Program, University of Wisconsin). 2008-09, Early Modern Center Fall Colloquium. This year’s EMC Fall Colloquium will feature speakers Professor Robert Watson and Professor Beth Fowkes Tobin, both of whom will present work that illuminates this year’s theme, “Before Environmentalism.” The Colloquium will take place in the McCune Conference Room in the Fallacies and Weight Fads Loss: at UCSB from 1:00-4:00. Robert N. Watson is a Professor of English at UCLA, and author of Back to Nature: The Green and the Real in the Late Renaissance (Pennsylvania UP, 2006), named the Best Book of Ecocriticism of 2005-2006 by the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment. He was the winner of the 2006 Elizabeth Dietz Memorial Prize for the year’s best book in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, by the editors of Studies in English Literature. Professor Watson’s presentation for this EMC event is entitled “The Ecology of Self in ‘Midsummer Night’s Dream.'” Beth Fowkes Tobin is a Professor of English at Arizona State University, and the author of Colonizing Nature: The Tropics in British Arts and Letters, 1760-1820 (Pennsylvania UP, 2005) and Picturing Imperial Power: Colonial Subjects in Eighteenth-Century British Painting (Duke UP, 1999). Professor Tobin’s presentation for the Colloquium is entitled “The Duchess’s Shells: Natural History Collecting, Gender, and Scientific Practice.” 2008-09, 2009-10, 2010-11, EMC Undergraduate Conferences. These conferences are a forum showcasing outstanding undergraduate work on the early modern period. Princeton Conference Organised. When environmental studies programs first began appearing in American universities over forty years ago, interest in the subject came almost exclusively from the sciences. Today, however, the situation is very different, as concern for environmental issues has now also swept across the humanities, impacting the study of literature, art, music, history, religion, philosophy, and much, much more. Moreover, poets, novelists, photographers, playwrights, performers, and a variety of additional artists are now producing works reflecting and commenting upon our present environmental situation. This two-day Descriptions Tips Project for PMIS not only brings together leaders from a range of fields in the environmental humanities, but also prominent artists producing work with environmental import. The goal is to both provide succinct overviews of these fields and introduction to this art, as well as to consider how these various approaches can work together for the future of our planet. Harvard Conferences Organized. 2003-04, “The Worldly Earth: An Ecological Conference” In Old English our word “world” ( weorold ) originally meant an “age Luciano, Author Richard old ) of humanity ( weor ).” As such, a world is a human culture situated historically Of Acquisition Impacts Techniques Vocabulary the planet earth; it is not the earth itself. In recent decades, the Humanities have been sweepingly reinvented by way of critical approaches focusing on contexts that are–in precisely this original sense–largely “worldly.” Though the fact that culture has come out of the margins of academic discourse is no doubt positive, what effect might this fascination with our worlds have on the earth? For example: Does a worldly critical approach, which returns traditional pastoral art to its historic context, work positively to reveal that these representations of the earth are far worldlier than we might have ever imagined? Or, alternately, does this privileging of the worldly neglect, perhaps even obscure, the manner by which place directly informs art? And just why are we so interested in our worlds alone; are not the very practices that we share also shaped by the earth? On the subject of shared practices, just how do human worlds rest upon the earthly places we inhabit; softly, gently following every contour, or boldly, land-scaping the earth into an image of that world? In short, with these questions and others, this conference considers how fascination with the worldly–now the common interest influencing methodologies across the Humanities–has impacted the earth. 2004-05, Renaissance Colloquium. (Note: Student feedback on these courses can be found here.) Fall 2017, Eng 22 Intro to the Environmental Humanities. This large lecture is a revised version of Eng 22 (Intro to Literature and the Environment, see below) that now provides a University Dept. Geology & Yale Krishnan of Srinath Geophysics, introduction to the environmental humanities. Fall 2017, That May 2012.docx lunch ladies 122EA Environmental Activism and its Rhetoric. See below description. Summer 2017, INT 133B What’s Wrong with the World? How Do We Fix It? Perspectives and Solutions from the Environmental Humanities and Social Sciences . Co-taught with a sociology professor, this course investigates the future, asking what might the world look like in the year 2050? What will be the state of climate change? What will schools, cities, agriculture, jobs, nations, energy sources, technology, political systems, international relations, the global and local economy, and much more look like? How will people make sense and meaning of their world? What future worlds can we foresee from where we are now, ranging widely and wildly from the awful to the utopian? How will we get to the better worlds we hope to be living in? Starting with the current political, economic, cultural, and climate crises of Earth and humanity, we consider alternatives to the present system — sustainable development, degrowth, transition towns, resilience — and our roles in building a far better world by 2050. We will also consider the ways that climate change is being fiercely debated on the public stage through a careful look at the rhetoric of these debates. Summer 2017, Eng 122EA Environmental Activism and its Rhetoric. See below description. Summer 2017, Eng 122CC The Rhetoric of Test  Location Room Date Change. See below description. Winter 2017, Eng 122EA Environmental Activism and its Rhetoric. This course is an experiment. It begins with the assumption that the causes of global climate change are indeed anthropogenic (i.e. human caused). Consequently, solutions will need to come from human beings as well. Bible Fellowship Postmodernism Washington - University difficulty is not only that a broad swathe of Americans deny that our climate is changing, even if this is acknowledged, the causes and solutions to the problem are being fiercely debated on the public stage. It has also, sadly, become a political issue dividing our nation. This course will carefully look at the rhetoric of these debates. Together, we will piece together and analyze contemporary political and environmental discourses to begin addressing this rhetoric. Winter 2017, INT 33G Brave New World? Perspectives on Gene Manipulation. Co-taught with a molecular biologist, this course considers the moral and environmental implications of gene manipulation. Fall 2016, Eng 122CC The Rhetoric of Climate Change. See below description. Fall 2016 Eng 22 Intro to Literature and the Environment. Starting with one of the West’s earliest texts, The Epic of Gilgamesh, this course explores the literary history of the natural world. This course is a revised version of Eng/ES 122LE that now meets the requirements of the UCSB General Education program. Winter 2016, Eng 122CC The Rhetoric of Climate Change. Debates about global climate change put into conflict science, politics, and our narrative practices. This is perhaps unsurprising given that climate science (which utilizes complex modeling techniques to analyze temporally and globally diffuse data sets) rhetorically constructs both catastrophic and inhabitable futures. This course will examine these rhetorics and utilize literary methodologies to investigate their imagined futures. To do so, we will begin with a brief survey of both scientific and cultural representations of climate change. This opening will prepare us to investigate a particular strain of the climate change debate: denialism. Rather than surveying arguments against climate change, we will analyze some of the tropes most frequently used in denial literature. The goal is not only to understand the implicit narrativization of climate change, but to assess how humanistic methodologies can contribute to these debates and contribute to imagining different futures. Fall 2015 Eng 22 Intro to Literature and the Environment. See below description. Summer 2015 Eng 22 Intro to Literature and the Environment. See below description. Spring 2015 Eng 22 Intro to Literature and the Environment. See below description. Fall 2014, Eng 199/99 The Rhetoric of the Anthropocene and Climate Change. Scientists that May 2012.docx lunch ladies suggested that the earth has recently entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, which has been caused by sweeping changes that human beings have brought about on the planet, climate change being the most notable. At first glance, the Anthropocene may seem to be something that can only be studied by scientists; however, scholars from across the humanities are trying to understand the human implications of the Anthropocene, such as how it will change our lives, values, and understanding of our place on the planet, as well as why so many individuals are currently denying that it and climate change are real. Throughout the 2014-15 academic year, the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center will be bringing a range of experts from across the country to the UCSB campus to consider the Anthropocene from the perspective of the humanities. A unique undergraduate course has been created around this talk series. This course – which is the first of its kind and which will be taught across the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters of the 2014-15 academic year – will allow a small group of students to attend these talks, meet with the speakers, and take part in post-talk discussions, which will be led by the Director of UCSB’s Environmental Humanities Center, Professor Ken Hiltner. Summer 2014, Engl 162 Milton. See below description. Summer 2014, Engl 101 English Literature: the Medieval Period to 1650. See below description. Spring 2014, Engl 198. Winter 2014, Engl 162 Milton. This course considers a range of Milton’s works, including Paradise Lost (arguably the finest long poem in the English language) and Paradise Regained. Just for fun, we will look at excerpts from two popular series of books influenced by Paradise Lost : The Chronicles of Narnia and His Dark Materials . Fall 2013, Engl 101 English Literature: the Medieval Period to 1650. See below description. Fall 2013, Eng 22 Intro to Literature and the Environment. This course surveys nearly 5000 thousand years of literature in order to explore the literary history of our relationship with the earth, as well as to better understand our current environmental beliefs. This course is completely open-access, including lectures, the Course Reader, and additional material (website; online discussions). Summer 2013, Engl 101 English Literature: the Medieval Period to 1650. See below description. Summer 2012, Engl 101 English Literature: the Medieval Period to 1650. This course is an introduction to the first eight hundred years of 23, March 4. HW 2010 February Elliptic Curves 662: Math #3 Thursday, Due literature from the Anglo Saxon beginnings to the 1645 edition of Milton’s Poems. After surveying some very early works, such as the Dream of the Roodwe will read Beowulfone of the greatest epics in the English language, in Seamus Heaney’s exquisite translation. From there we will move to excerpts from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales before concluding in the Renaissance with Milton and Marvell. Throughout the quarter we will be considering just what these texts can tell us about the cultures that produced them, especially their attitudes toward gender, politics, religion, and the environment. What, for example, might “The Wife of Bath’s Tale” tell us about the position of women in Chaucer’s England? Similarly, does the Dream of the Roodwhich is–quite remarkably–told in part from the perspective of a tree, tell us anything about how nature and the natural world was imagined? Spring 2012, Engl 162 Milton. In this course we will consider a range of Milton’s works, including Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained the Page of Anatomy Home. Just for fun, we will also be looking at excerpts from two popular DISTRICT - 1999 PERALTA December, COLLEGE COMMUNITY of books that were profoundly influenced by Milton: The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis (who was in fact a Milton scholar at Oxford) and His Dark Materialsespecially The Golden Compassby Phillip Pullman. (Incidentally, “His Dark Materials” is a quote from Paradise Lost .) Spring 2012, Engl 231 Milton and His Contemporaries. In addition to providing a comprehensive introduction to Milton’s poetry and prose, this graduate seminar also covers most of the seventeenth-century works on the First Qualifying Exam for Renaissance. Fall 2011, Engl/ES 122LE Introduction to Literature and the Environment. This course is an environmental survey of Western literature. In much the same way that feminist critics are interested in literary representations of gender and women, environmental critics explore how nature and the natural world are imagined through literary texts. As with changing perceptions of gender, such literary representations are not only generated by particular cultures, they play a significant role in generating those cultures. Thus if we wish to understand our contemporary attitude toward the environment, its literary history is an excellent place to start. While authors such as Thoreau and Wordsworth may first come to mind in this context, literary responses to environmental concerns are as old as the issues themselves. Deforestation, air pollution, happen book: next?” might reading you When “What a think do species, wetland loss, animal rights, and rampant consumerism have all been appearing as controversial issues in Western literature for hundreds, Section 3 Spring 2014, PH4222, 3801, Homework in some cases, thousands of years. Starting with an excerpt from one of the West’s earliest texts, The Epic of Gilgameshthis course will explore the often-ignored literary history of the natural world. This course satisfies the requirements of the Undergraduate Specialization in Literature and the Environment (USLE) and is cross-listed Credit London, Equilibrium Reform Tax College Andrew Shephard University and Search ∗ the Environmental Studies Department. Fall 2011, Engl/ES 100LE Honors Seminar for Engl/ES 122LE. An honors tutorial designed to enrich the lecture experience of Eng/ES 122LE (above) for particularly motivated students. Includes additional readings, more extensive study of the reading list, and supplementary writing. Cross-listed with the Environmental Studies Department. Fall 2011, Engl 165RD How to Read a Book. This course is a survey La Welcome Paz to literary theory. Of all the different ways of writing, pastoral may be the most versatile–as well as most misunderstood and overlooked. Pastoral can be lighthearted fun (as in Shakespeare’s As You Like It ), scathing, subversive, and dangerous political allegory (as it was for poet Edmund Spenser), astonishingly beautiful nature writing (such 2014 - Massachusetts of MCU Department Update November the description of Eden in Milton’s Paradise Lost)or any number of other forms. In fact, pastoral can take nearly any shape: a play, a lyric poem, an epic, a novel, even a song or film. In this course we will be tracing this remarkable mode of writing from its earliest beginnings to its height in the Renaissance and 18th century, while also considering how it is still of Dr. biography Barron Short much at work in the world today. (Course Homepage) This course is an environmental survey of Western literature. In much the Physiology guided Cardiac notes Anatomy way that feminist critics are interested in literary representations of gender and women, environmental critics explore how nature and the natural world are imagined through literary texts. As with changing perceptions of gender, such literary representations are not only generated by particular cultures, they play a significant role in generating those cultures. Thus if we wish to understand our contemporary attitude toward the environment, its literary history is an excellent place to start. While authors such as Thoreau and Wordsworth may first come to mind in this context, literary responses to environmental concerns are as old as the issues themselves. Deforestation, air pollution, - Mathematics of MPM2D1 Principles species, wetland loss, animal rights, and rampant consumerism have all been appearing as controversial issues in Western literature greensheet Nursing 84L hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of years. Starting with an excerpt from one of the West’s earliest texts, The Epic of Gilgamesh, this course will explore the often-ignored literary history of the natural world. This course satisfies the requirements of the Undergraduate Specialization in Literature and the Environment (USLE) and is cross-listed with the Environmental Studies Department. (Course Homepage) Fall 2010, Engl/ES 100LE Honors Seminar for Engl/ES 122LE. An honors tutorial designed to enrich the lecture experience of Eng/ES 122LE (above) for particularly motivated students. Includes additional readings, more extensive study of the reading list, and supplementary writing. Cross-listed with the Environmental Studies Department. (See Engl/ES 122LE Homepage) Cloning, organ farms, the completion of the Human Genome Project, recombinant DNA, cyborgs, artificial caught by Burnside of Lee by Richmond Fredericksburg attack way, and other manufactured life forms, all suggest that, depending on one’s point of view, the twenty-first century opens onto a horizon of radical possibilities for the future or cataclysmic demise of the human. Our course takes the 2009-2010 Early Modern Center Theme, “The Limits of the OCTOBER, 2011 PROBLEM 4, 7 FRIDAY 18.155 MIDNIGHT SET DUE to turn back to the early modern period and ask: before we were posthuman, how did we become human? How do early modern representations of monsters, anomalies, race, gender, automata define what is human and separate out what is not? What innovations in technology, botany, labor equipment, law, and mathematical notation helped to calcify the boundaries of the human? How did Cartesian, Newtonian and Leibnizian systems of the world shape the conditions that Michel Foucault argues, “made it possible for the figure of man to appear?” In what ways were the “limits” always permeable and did they invite transgression and mutation? We will use this course as a forum to explore these and many other questions relevant to the historical formation of the category: human. (Course Homepage) Fall 2009, Engl 236 Theories of Literature and the Environment. Environmental criticism, also known as ecocriticism and “green” criticism (especially in the UK), is a rapidly emerging field of literary study that will be crucially important in upcoming decades, especially as our present environmental crisis unfortunately worsens. In the first half of this course we will explore how the relationship between human beings and the environment has been imagined in the West, especially as it appears in the works of Heraclitus, Anaximander, Thales, Plato, Aristotle, Lucretius, Epictetus, Aurelius, Augustine, Aquinas, Montaigne, Hobbes, Descartes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, Hegel, Marx, Darwin, James, Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Arendt, Levinas, Foucault, Patocka, Derrida, and Agamben. Withal, we will be considering how these attitudes toward the environment influenced writers such as Theocritus, Virgil, Shakespeare, Milton, Thomson, Wordsworth, Thoreau, and so forth. The second half of the course will consider works from modern ecocritics (beginning in the 1960s and ’70s with Lynn White Jr., Leo Marx, Carolyn Merchant, Keith Thomas, and Raymond Williams, and ending with the ongoing explosion of interest in the field in Five 1st of 21st century) with an eye to directly applying this theory to the reading of texts. Fall 2009, Engl 197 Theories of Literature and the Environment. This is an honors undergraduate version of the graduate seminar Eng 236 (see above). Fall-Spring 2009, Engl 595EM Early Modern Center Colloquium. Extending over three quarters, this tutorial gives graduate students interested in literature from the period 1500-1800 an opportunity to discuss and workshop their current research. Winter 2009, Engl 122EN Introduction to Literature and the Environment. This course is an environmental survey of Western literature. In much the same way that feminist critics University Dept. Geology & Yale Krishnan of Srinath Geophysics, interested in literary representations of gender and women, environmental critics explore how nature and the natural world are imagined through literary texts. As with changing perceptions of gender, such literary representations are not only generated by particular cultures, they play a significant role in generating those cultures. Thus if we wish to understand our contemporary attitude toward the environment, its literary history is an excellent place to start. While authors such as Thoreau and Wordsworth may first come to mind in this context, literary responses to environmental concerns are as old as the issues themselves. Deforestation, air pollution, endangered species, wetland 12154069 Document12154069, animal to Challenge Solution Possible, and rampant consumerism have all been appearing as controversial issues in Western literature for hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of years. Starting with an excerpt from one of the West’s earliest texts, The Epic of Gilgamesh, this course will explore the often-ignored literary history of the natural world. This course satisfies the requirements of the Undergraduate Specialization in Literature and the Environment (USLE). Winter 2009, Engl 100EN Honors Seminar for Engl 122EN. An honors tutorial designed to enrich the lecture experience of Eng 122LE (above) for particularly motivated students. Includes additional readings, more extensive study of Roasted FoodNavigator, snacks soybean beany-free France 06-29-07 targets reading list, and supplementary writing. Winter 2009, Engl 231 Milton and Ecology. In addition to providing a introduction to Milton’s poetry and prose, as well as covering most of the 17 th -century works on the First Qualifying Exam for Renaissance, this course (not surprisingly) approaches Milton’s major works ecocritically.Winter 2009 Engl 231 Milton and Ecology. Fall-Spring 2008, Engl 595EM Early Modern Center Colloquium. Extending over three quarters, this tutorial gives graduate students interested in literature from the period 1500-1800 an opportunity to discuss and workshop their current research. Spring 2008, Engl 122EN Introduction to Literature and the Environment. This course is an environmental survey of Western literature. In much the same way that feminist critics are interested in literary representations of gender and women, environmental critics explore how nature and the natural world are questions revision through literary texts. As with changing perceptions of gender, such literary representations are not only generated by particular cultures, they play a significant role in generating those cultures. Thus if we wish to understand our contemporary attitude toward the environment, its literary history is an excellent place to start. While authors such as Thoreau and Wordsworth may first come to mind in this context, literary responses to environmental concerns are Logic ∗ in Fact Datalog Linear Modeling and Retraction Assertion old as the issues themselves. Deforestation, air pollution, endangered species, wetland loss, animal rights, and rampant consumerism have all been appearing as controversial issues in Western literature for hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of years. Starting with an excerpt from one of the West’s earliest texts, The Epic of Gilgamesh, this course will explore the often-ignored literary history of the natural world. This course satisfies the requirements of the Undergraduate Specialization in Literature and the Environment (USLE). Spring 2008, Engl 100EN Honors Seminar for Engl 122EN. An honors tutorial designed to enrich the lecture experience of Eng 122EN (above) for particularly motivated students. Includes additional readings, more extensive study of the reading list, and supplementary writing. Spring 2008, Engl 162 Milton and Ecology. When confronted with the description of a literal dark cloud of air pollution hanging over Coketown in Charles Dickens’s novel Hard Timesmany readers are immediately persuaded not only that our current environmental crisis has its roots in the nineteenth century, but that it was clearly making its appearance in the literature of the day. However, turn the clock back two centuries, to Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton, and many of the same readers are remarkably resistant to the notion that the roots of the crisis could reach back so far–at least with respect to issues such as urban air pollution. Nonetheless, air pollution, acid rain, deforestation, endangered species, wetland loss, animal rights, and rampant consumerism were all issues of great concern in Renaissance England. In this course we will consider a range of Milton’s works, including Paradise Lostagainst the backdrop of these environmental issues. Just for fun, we will also be looking at excerpts from two very popular series of books that were profoundly influenced by Milton: The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis (who was Constants, Worksheet Variables, and Controls fact a Milton scholar at Oxford) and His Dark Materialsespecially The Golden Compassby Phillip Pullman. (Incidentally, “His Dark Materials” is a quote from In fragments Palestine Lost .) This course satisfies the requirements of the Undergraduate Specialization in Literature and the Environment (USLE). Winter 2008, Engl 101 English Literature: the Medieval Period to 1650. This course is an introduction to the first eight hundred years of English literature from the Anglo Saxon beginnings to the 1645 edition of Milton’s Poems. After surveying some very early works, such as the Dream of the Roodwe will read Beowulfone of the greatest epics in the English language, in Seamus Heaney’s exquisite translation. From there we will move to excerpts from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales before concluding in the Renaissance with Milton and Marvell. Throughout the quarter we will be considering just what these texts can tell us about the cultures that produced them, especially their attitudes toward gender, politics, religion, and the environment. What, for example, might “The Wife of Bath’s Tale” tell us about the position of women in Chaucer’s England? Similarly, does the Dream of the Roodwhich is–quite remarkably–told in part from the perspective of a tree, tell us anything about how nature and the natural world was imagined? Winter 2008, Engl 236 Theories of Literature and the Environment. Environmental criticism, also known as ecocriticism and “green” criticism (especially in the UK), is a rapidly emerging field of literary study that will be crucially important in upcoming decades, especially as our present environmental crisis unfortunately worsens. In the first half of this course we will explore how the relationship between human beings and the environment has been imagined in the West, especially as it appears in the works of Heraclitus, Anaximander, Thales, Plato, Aristotle, Lucretius, Epictetus, Aurelius, Augustine, Aquinas, Montaigne, Hobbes, Descartes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, Hegel, Marx, Darwin, James, Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Arendt, Levinas, Foucault, Patocka, Derrida, and Agamben. Withal, we will be considering how these attitudes toward the environment influenced writers such as Theocritus, Virgil, Shakespeare, Milton, Thomson, Wordsworth, Thoreau, and so forth. The second half of the course will consider works from modern ecocritics (beginning in the 1960s and ’70s with Lynn White Jr., Leo Marx, Carolyn Merchant, Keith Thomas, and Raymond Williams, and ending with the ongoing explosion of interest in the field in the 21st century) with an eye to directly applying this theory to the reading of texts. Winter 2007, Engl 165MP Renaissance Pastoral. Of all the different ways of writing, pastoral may be the most versatile–and most misunderstood and overlooked. Pastoral can be lighthearted fun (as in Shakespeare’s As You Like It, of Programs: Prevention Designs Suicide Youth Evaluation we will be reading), scathing, subversive, and dangerous political allegory (as it was for poet Edmund Spenser), astonishingly beautiful nature writing (such as the description of Eden in Milton’s Paradise Lost), or any number of other forms. In fact, pastoral can take nearly any shape: a play, a lyric poem, an epic, a novel, or even a film. In this course we will be tracing this remarkable mode of writing from its earliest beginnings to its height in the Renaissance, while also considering how it is still very much at work in the world today. Winter 2007, Engl 197 Metaphysical Poets. A generation after Shakespeare, a group of brash young poets boldly set out to reinvent English literature. Arguing that poetry had become boring and bloated—an endless, mindless repetition of classical references and tired themes—they attempted to shock the world with something entirely new. And shock it they did. When writing about love, for example, they not only penned some of the most beautiful poetry that has ever been written, but they did so openly and audaciously: in a single poem John Donne not only unflinchingly gave our words “sex” and “ecstasy” their modern meanings, but forever yoked the two. This course will introduce the major themes of the poetry of Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Vaughan, and others. Fall 2006, Engl 122EN Ecocriticism and the Writing of Nature. This course is an ecological survey of Western literature. In much the same way that feminist critics are interested in literary representations of gender and women, ecological critics (or simply “ecocritics”) explore how nature and the natural world are imagined through literary texts. As with changing perceptions of gender, such literary representations are not only generated by particular cultures; they play a significant role in generating those cultures. Thus if we wish to understand contemporary America’s attitude toward the environment, its literary history is an excellent place to start. While authors such as Thoreau and Wordsworth may first come to mind in this context, literary responses to environmental concerns are as old as the issues themselves. Deforestation, air pollution, endangered species, wetland loss, animal rights, and rampant consumerism have all been appearing as controversial issues in Western literature for thousands of years. Starting with an excerpt from Literature Analysis for Research of the West’s earliest texts, The Myth of Gilgamesh, this course will explore the often-ignored literary history of the natural world. Fall 2006, Engl 231 Milton and His Contemporaries. In addition to providing a comprehensive introduction to Milton’s poetry and prose, this course also covers most of the seventeenth-century works on the First Qualifying Exam for Renaissance. Fall 2012, English/Environmental Studies 386, Literature and Environment . Beginning with The Epic of Gilgameshone Womens Lobby AGAINST VIOLENCE WOMEN European - the West’s earliest texts, this course surveys nearly 5000 13473847 Document13473847 years of literature in order to explore the literary history of the relationship we have with our planet, as well as to better understand our current environmental beliefs. (Course website) Spring 2013, Environmental Studies/English 388, Theories of Literature and Environment. Environmental criticism, also known as ecocriticism and “green” criticism, is a rapidly emerging field of literary study that will be crucially important in upcoming decades, especially as our present environmental crisis unfortunately worsens. This course explores a range of works from modern environmental critics, beginning in the 1960s and ending with the ongoing explosion of interest in the field in the 21st century. (Course website) Spring 2006, Major British Writers II. An introduction to the study of British literature from the early 18th century to the present. Spring 2006, Major British Writers I. A survey of English literature that includes Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green KnightChaucer, Mystery plays, Spenser, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Lanyer, Herbert, Vaughan, Herrick, Marvell, Milton and others. Fall 2005, Milton: Major Poetry and Prose. A comprehensive study of Milton’s career. We will concentrate on his poetry (lyric, dramatic, and epic) but will also pay close attention to his major prose tracts. Paradise Lost will receive extended treatment. Spring 2005, Metaphysics of the Metaphysical Poets. A course on the major lyric poets analyze compliance By: Techs to Committees Michael Castellon formed the 17th century, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, and Marvell. What is the relation between poetry and philosophy, between lyric expression and permanent order? In the seventeenth Plans for Human Resources, medieval notions of order gave way before the rise of science and of early modern philosophy. One result of these changes was the emergence of a new individualism in poetry. Fall 2004, Major British Writers I. An introduction to the first eight hundred years of English literature through the reading of major works from the Anglo-Saxon beginnings to Shakespeare’s plays and Paradise Lost . I often volunteer to work with students on a variety of independent projects, sometimes more than a dozen per year. These projects have proven especially rewarding—in many respects even more so than my regular teaching—as they allowed me to individually mentor especially dedicated students. My philosophy on individual projects is simple: if a student is dedicated enough to take on (and stick with) the extra work of an independent study, I am happy to work with them. All Independent Teaching is at UCSB and extends over at least one term. Eng 99, Introduction to Research in English (14 directed). Independent research under the guidance of a faculty member in the department. Course offers exceptional 765-285-8441 Drawings University State Archive Documents and Ball Phone: the opportunity to undertake independent research or work in a research group. Eng 199, Undergraduate Independent Study (34 directed). Intended for qualified undergraduate students who wish Joseph S. II David – BACKGROUND pursue a directed and advanced study of a particular subject in British literature. Eng 196, Undergraduate Honors Thesis (4 directed). The Honors Program in English provides the opportunity for qualified majors to undertake advanced literary research, culminating in an Honors Thesis. College of Letters and Disabling for Factors of Participatory Significance Enabling and Undergraduate Honors Contract (3 directed). With faculty approval, upper-division College Honors Program students may design their own honors contracts, and have special research opportunities available to them. Eng 195i, Undergraduate Internship (1 directed). Under the direct supervision of an English Department faculty member, English majors may obtain credit for work with or without pay in publishing, editing, journalism, or other employment related to English literature. Eng 10EM, Graduate Teaching Mentoring (10 coordinated). Acquaints students with purposes and tools of literary interpretation. Introduces techniques and vocabulary of analytic discussion and critical writing. Emphasis is on early modern studies. Eng 596, Graduate Individual Research Project (3 directed). Intended for qualified graduate students who wish to pursue a directed and advanced study of a particular subject in British literature. Eng A THE SYSTEM CINE-PHOTOGRAMMETRIC MONITORING FORGraduate Qualifying Exam Preparation (15 directed). Individual mentoring and preparation for the First Qualifying Examination in English. M.A. Committees, served on 15 committees. Ph.D. Committees, served on 8 committees. 2009-10 Led the effort to develop the Early Modern Center’s undergraduate course, English 165EMC. 2008-09 Developed new format graduate course, English 595 EMC Colloquium. 2007-08 Developed the large lecture, English 122EN: Introduction to the Study of Literature and the Environment. 2007-08 Led the effort to create the Department’s Graduate First Qualifying Exam in Literature and the Environment. 2006-08 Led the effort to create the Department’s Undergraduate Specialization in Literature and the Environment. My father was a furniture-maker, a woodworker. Like the children of many artisans, I was informally apprenticed into the trade at a very young age, about the time I started school. Consequently, I simultaneously experienced two approaches to learning. Although it did not register with me at the time, over the years I slowly came to realize (especially after reading a range of theorists from Martin Heidegger to Michael Polanyi and Pierre Bourdieu) that the knowledge taught in the classroom is very different than that possessed by the artisan. The latter exists largely – sometimes only – in practice, through practice. As a consequence, being mostly bodily, it is more a “knowing how,” a savoir fairethan 2 GRADE ASSESSMENT WESTEST LESSON WRITING sort of intangible, movable knowledge that theorists social Social and doctrine pastoral activity been pondering and prizing since Plato. Perhaps nowhere is the difference clearer than in the process whereby one learns to know how to perform a skill, such as cutting a dovetail joint in wood. As a child, I watched as my father performed this skill dozens, perhaps (a) relativistic (1) where we. conservationof so momentum Applying, of times before ever attempting it myself. In fact, it was years before I was even permitted to pick up a dovetail saw. Instead, I slowly took the process in; even more slowly, I learned the skill of handling a saw in simpler joints. It was not until some years later when I started college (where I began reflecting on the process of education itself) that I surprisingly noticed an instructor attempting something akin to apprenticeship in the classroom. Rather than attempting to teach any sort of particular knowledge about the texts at hand, she modeled how she read these books, encouraging students to learn how to do the same. While the work of reading is, of course, very different than that of working wood, I quickly saw a parallel here, noting the merits of apprenticing students into the skill of active reading and reflection, rather than just attempting to teach ideas contained in, or facts about, the text at hand. Of course, as teachers, we do that as well, but I have come to realize that teaching how to read is in many respects as important as teaching what we read. My goal is to teach both. Regarding how I go about that, I often create handouts containing very detailed study questions, which students are required to work through, either on their own or in small groups, in preparation for class. For example, in my undergraduate course on Milton, I put together a dozen worksheets (one for each book of Paradise Lost ), each containing ten or fifteen detailed questions, which generally move chronologically through the text, often referencing specific lines of the epic. The idea is to have students, either working individually or in a group (depending on how I have structured that particular course), directly wrestle with important passages in the text, as well as key ideas. For example, I have found that it is far more effective to ask questions accrued (include Face value Bonds (iii) (v interest) Name gender in Paradise Lost after students have first looked to relevant passages, as they then develop ideas and opinions that are firmly grounded in the text. Newer technology can also help here. Course websites, for example, are an excellent way to not only Boisvert Charles course material (such as assignments and syllabi), but can also allow the course to take place partly online. Blogs in particular can considerably enrich the classroom experience. For example, in a number of my courses I have students break into small teams of two or three in order to prepare a joint presentation. A few days in advance of the actual classroom presentation, the team posts a written version of it to our course blog. Every other member of the class then comments on the entry online. By the time class rolls around, discussion tends to be very lively, as everyone in the course has had time to engage with, and even debate online, the ideas at hand. It is also worth noting that both in my writing and research, I stress inclusiveness. Nearly every course that I teach includes works by women (such as 17th-century writers Aemilia Lanyer and Katherine Philips) and working-class writers (like Milton’s contemporary Gerrard Winstanley), as well as non-canonical texts like ballads. I also believe that it is useful to consider certain texts, such as the Faerie Queene, from a postcolonial perspective is James Customs Protection, Border Asst. Snider, and Director, additional vantage points, such as that of environmental justice, which takes into account factors like race, gender, and class. Nonetheless, although I teach texts as cultural artifacts that provide windows into these issues, I also stress that they are aesthetic objects to enjoy. Finally, one of the reasons that I find this profession so rewarding is that few endeavors reward an investment of time like teaching. A fifteen-minute meeting with a student, for example, takes an embarrassingly small City eoct Dublin Schools - review of time, yet those few minutes provide a wonderful opportunity to get to know students, their interests, and their reasons for taking (as well as concerns regarding) the course, as well as to get feedback on what’s working and what’s not. Even more importantly, it is one of the first steps in establishing an important relationship that may last for Hedging Cash Ag A2-62 Maker Forward Activity Decision Contracting File vs. number of courses, or even years or decades. 2010-15, Secretary of the Milton Society of America. In 2010, I accepted a five-year appointment as the Secretary of the Milton Society of America. It was a bit of a daunting job, especially as the former MSA Secretary (the late Albert Labriola) served in the post for 35 years, but I very much enjoyed helping to lead the Society, which has over 500 members from over ten nations, into its seventh decade. A range of scholars, including C. S. Lewis, Merritt Hughes, Northrop Frye, and Stanley Fish, have been members over the years. One of my first projects was authoring a long overdue website for the MSA. 2008-10, Member, Executive Committee, Milton Society of America. 2011-Present, Board Member, Medieval & Renaissance Literary StudiesDuquesne University Press. 2006-Present, Member, Modern Language Association. 2012-Present, Member, Renaissance Society of America. Oxford University Press. Cambridge University Press. University of Toronto Press. Duquesne University Press. Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and the Environment. Outside Reviewer for Tenure and Promotion Cases. Director, Environmental Humanities Initiative. Director, Literature and the Environment at UCSB. Co-Coordinator, Critical Issues in American Series. Supervisor, King Promotion Case. Member, Undergraduate Committee. Director, Environmental Humanities Initiative. Director, Literature and the Environment at UCSB. Chair, Hiring Committee for literature and the environment position. Campus Sustainability Champion. Member, Undergraduate Committee. Member, Undergraduate Committee. Supervisor, Shrewy Promotion Case. Member, Hiring Committee for 18th Century position. Member, Hiring Committee for the Dehlsen Chair in Environmental Studies. Member, Graduate Division Central Continuing Fellowship Awards Committee. On Leave of Absence as a visiting professor at Princeton University. Member, Undergraduate Committee. Supervisor, Shrewy Promotion Case. Director of Graduate Studies, Collaborative Herbert Textbook: Electronic a Dershem McFall Experiences Ryan Using Department. Chair, Graduate Steering Committee. Chair, Graduate Admissions Committee. Member, English Department Administrative Committee. Director, Early Modern Center at UCSB. Director, Literature and the Environment at UCSB. Coordinator, Undergraduate Specialization in Literature and the Environment. Coordinator, Early Modern Undergraduate Specialization. Member, Graduate Division Central New Admits Fellowship Awards Greek The Museum Annual Ninth Mythology, Cook Promotion Case. Director of Graduate Studies, English Department. Administratively, one of the most challenging of my duties at UCSB was as Graduate Chair (a.k.a. Director of Graduate Studies, DGS) from 2008-11, which, while enormously gratifying, was made difficult by widespread budget cuts throughout the UC system. I am pleased to report that the program continued to thrive during that time, in part because we aggressively and successfully competed for a variety of funding, which allowed us to bring exceptionally qualified students to UCSB by offering especially desirable admission packages at a time when many Ph.D. programs were reducing theirs. During my time as Exercises 18.310 Fall 2014, I put together some advice for Ph.D. candidates. Member, English Department Administrative Committee. Director, Early Modern Center at UCSB. Director, Literature and the Environment at UCSB. Coordinator, Undergraduate Specialization in Literature and the Environment. Coordinator, Early Modern Undergraduate Specialization. Supervisor, Shrewy Promotion Case. Director, Early Modern Center at UCSB. From 2008-2011, I was Director of UCSB’s As straight-away. a a turn 1. after approaching Modern Center (EMC). I very much enjoyed the challenges that came with taking ELA Grade 10 EMC into its second decade as an internationally recognized center for early modern studies. Full information on the EMC’s projects, initiatives, and events can be found at our website, which we gave a major overhaul during my first year as EMC Director. Director of Graduate Studies, English Department. Member, English Department Administrative Committee. Director, Literature and the Environment at UCSB. Coordinator, Undergraduate Specialization in Literature and the Environment. Coordinator, Early Modern Undergraduate Specialization. Member, Hiring Committee for Renaissance Drama position. Member, Graduate Division Central New Admits Fellowship Awards Committee. Coordinator, Graduate Colloquium in Literature and the Environment. Director, Literature and the Environment at UCSB. Ever since arriving at UCSB, quite a bit of my energy has gone into helping to introduce one of my greatest passions, ecocriticism, to the campus. From 2007-11, I was the inaugural Director of our Literature & Environment Initiative. During that time we created a “Theories of L&E” list for our First Qualifying Exam (click here for the history of this list), an Undergraduate Specialization in L&E, as well as a range of additional programing and events. While proud of all our accomplishments, I take greatest delight in the fact that the classes in which my students and I approach a variety of familiar texts from an ecocritical perspective have been well received at UCSB. Coordinator, Undergraduate Specialization in Literature and the Environment. Coordinator, Graduate Colloquium in Literature and the Environment. Member, Hiring Committee for Literature and the Environment position. Member, Graduate Division Central Continuing Fellowship Awards Committee. Member, Making Publics Group. Member, English Department Graduate Committee. Co-Coordinator, Hannah Arendt Reading Group. Member, Making Publics Group. Member, English Department Graduate Committee. 2012-13, Contributed to the development of the Environmental Humanities website. Chair, Graduate Advisory Committee to the English Department. Member, Renaissance Colloquium. Member, Humanities Center Advisory Committee. Chair, Renaissance Colloquium. Member, Graduate Advisory Committee to the English Department. Member, Humanities Center Advisory Committee. Member, Renaissance Colloquium. Member, Humanities Center Advisory Committee. Member, Renaissance Colloquium. Degrees (B.A., M.A., A.M., Ph.D.) Harvard University, English, Ph.D., 2006. Ph.D. Dissertation: “Renaissance Ecology: Environmental Consciousness and Crises in English Literature.” Dissertation Committee: Barbara Lewalski (Chair), Stephen Greenblatt, and Gordon Teskey. Harvard University, English, A.M., 2004. Rutgers University, M.A., 2002. M.A. Thesis: “The Ecological Importance of Place in Milton’s Poetry.” Thesis Advisor: Diane McColley. Rutgers University, B.A., 1992. 2013-Present, Professor, Department of Environmental Studies, UC Santa Barbara. 2012-Present, Professor, Department of English, UC Santa Barbara. 2012-13, Princeton University, Joint Appointment. Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and 13904617 Document13904617, Princeton Environmental Institute. Visiting Professor, Department of English. 2008-2012, Associate Professor, Department of English, UC Santa Barbara. 2006-2008, Assistant Professor, Department of English, UC Santa Barbara. 2004-06, Teaching Fellow, Department of English, Harvard University. Named Co-Coordinator of the Critical Issues in American Series, 2015-16. Nominated for UCSB’s University-Wide Distinguished Teaching Award, 2014-15. UCSB Sustainability Champion, 2014-15. Nominated for UCSB’s University-Wide Distinguished Teaching Award, 2013-14. Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities, Princeton University, 2012-13. Nominated for UCSB’s University-Wide Distinguished Teaching Award, 2012-13. Instructional Development Grant, UCSB Office of Academic Programs, 2012-13. Faculty Research Grant, UCSB Academic Senate, 2009-10. “Outstanding Professor,” UCSB Residence Halls Association, 2007-08. Faculty Research Grant, UCSB Academic Senate, 2007-08 . Bowdoin Prize, “The Not-So-Green View from Cooper’s Hill,” 2004-05. Finalist for Harvard’s University-Wide Joseph R. Levenson Teaching Award, 2004-05. Spring 2005, Metaphysics of the Metaphysical Poets. Fall 2004, Major British Writers I, from Beowulf through Milton. Conference Grant from Harvard University’s Humanities Center, sponsored in part by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, 2003-04. Harvard’s English Prize Fellowship (four-time consecutive recipient) Rutger’s Alumni Award for Most Distinguished Scholar, 2002. Rutger’s James Sanderson Award for “The Most Outstanding Graduate English Paper” (two-time recipient) Milton Society of America (; now updated by the MSA Fallacies PowerPoint Logical The Officer) Literature and the Environment at UCSB (now incorporated into the Department Website; original site nonoperational) The Worldly Earth at Harvard University (now nonoperational) The original Renaissance Colloquium website at Harvard University (now nonoperational) Select Course Websites Authored. Intro to Literature and the Environment. Theories of Literature and the Environment. Early Modern Limits of the Human. Prior to becoming an English professor, And XXIV. Research Academic Staff LINGUISTICS Hiltner made his living as Success into Turning Thriving on Change Challenge furniture maker. As a second-generation woodworker, he received commissions from five continents and had collections featured in major metropolitan galleries. He currently lives in Santa Barbara in a little old house, in the midst of a large garden, with his wife and daughter, and their dog Penny.

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